I miss the ocean a ton. I’m hoping I’ll get to go there before the summer’s up.

Reading-wise, I’ve reached a nice turning point. Most of the heavy reading I had planned for the beginning of the year is complete (or abandoned, haha). I’m sure there will be some more in a few months, but for now, I plan to read “lightly.”

This is what’s currently on the menu:

  • Malicroix, reading with a friend
  • Yevgeny Onegin – This is the Anthony Briggs translation of Eugene Onegin (by Alexander Pushkin). I have already started it and am miffed that Briggs decided to use modern vulgar slang in it. However, I intend to finish it so as to give it a fair critique.
Pretty cool cover, though
  • Walden – Maybe… I was reading it with a book club, but I started late and got bogged down in Chapter 1. I found Thoreau’s ramblings interesting, but he does demand undivided attention, which I’ve lacked lately.
  • The Razor’s Edge – Unsure why I abandoned this Somerset Maugham book after part 1, because I loved it. Plan on finishing it.
  • Notes from Underground – Started re-reading this on a gloomy day. Dostoyevsky fits the mood.
  • Galaxy Soul: The Dreamer and the Seeker – A new poetry book by Mackenzie, a blogger I’ve followed for a while now. I am reading it slowly—each poem feels like a complete story that sinks into your heart and brings up a lot of nostalgia. Really good so far.
  • Assortment – I’ll doubtless pick up some random books along the way to read! I would really like to finish the Tesla Biography We Shall Not Speak Of… Ever…

6 thoughts on “Soon It Will Be June … Summer Reading Plans

  1. i went through a Thoreau madness several years ago and read all of his books i could find… i admired him a lot and feel that he changed my thinking in some major ways, together with the zen period i experienced just after that… Dostoyevski can be remarkable. as i recall i read about a third of Underground and for some reason never finished it… too grim, maybe… The Razor’s Edge was a bit dated, i thought… and misleading in some ways having to do with Eastern thought… great eclectic list, tho

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    1. That’s really interesting! The first part of Razor’s Edge was all about society, so I’ll be curious to get to the philosophical parts (but will read them with a grain of salt).

      What’s impressed me with Thoreau is how relevant his writing still is, especially with the issues we have today with housing and production. He seemed to be ahead of his time. 🙂

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  2. This is light reading?! This makes some of my heavy reading look like cotton candy fluff (random thought, I’ve been craving that). I find your reading lists inspiring, I don’t often see these books or I’ve never heard of them at all.

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  3. Well, good luck on Thoreau. He can come across a little cranky or arrogant sometimes, but his observations of nature are keen and inviting.

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