Some Bookish Pictures

Every so often, I get an urge to do something crafty.  “Crafty” here means having to do with crafts, not cunning plans (though it may amount to the same thing).  Today was one of those days, so I stopped by ye olde curiosity shoppe Dollar Tree and picked up some frames, because I’m cheap that way.

Remember this quote from Heretics?  I couldn’t find a great graphic of it online, so I decided to make one.  Here’s the printout (click for full size):

(The flourish is from Pixabay – I know they don’t require attribution, but I always feel like I should…habit!)

I picked up this little blue frame because it goes with my color scheme, but I wasn’t sure what picture to put in it.  I finally settled on the plans for the Nautilus (Disney version), along with Nemo’s motto, Mobilis in Mobili (“moving amidst mobility”).  Completely nerdy, but I love it.  🙂

Last bit of craftiness: I love triptychs, so thought I’d try creating one.  I found this whale picture uploaded by the Biodiversity Heritage Library, cleaned it up a little, and split it in three.  It was more difficult than I expected, but I think it turned out ok!  This one and the Chesterton quote I’ll probably be putting up on the wall at work.

Well, that’s it for now, but I have more ideas (and wall space), so there may be a part 2 to come.  😉

Two Views of the Twentieth Century – Episode 31

We kick off Season 3 with two giants of 19th-century science fiction: Jules Verne and Albert Robida.  Both French authors, Verne and Robida crafted futuristic novels set in the 20th century, predicting changes in technology and society.  Join me in this trip to the past, which at times feels amazingly reminiscent of the digital world we live in today.

Links / Further reading:
Paris in the Twentieth Century by Jules Verne
The Twentieth Century by Albert Robida

Picnic at Hanging Rock, and Other Classics for Summer – Episode 23

From the Arctic Circle to the South Pole and both sides of the globe, here’s six classics which will take you on an adventure this summer (and a little time travel, too!).

Links / Further Reading:
The Green Ray, by Jules Verne (Wikisource)
Picnic at Hanging Rock – Book review by O of On Bookes
The Endurance – Adam Young Scores
Shackleton – A&E series starring Kenneth Branagh
Opening quote read by David Barnes, read for the LibriVox audiobook South

Wednesday Quote: Independence

'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' by Neuville and Riou 027

“The sea doesn’t belong to tyrants. On its surface they can still exercise their iniquitous claims, battle each other, devour each other, haul every earthly horror. But thirty feet below sea level, their dominion ceases, their influence fades, their power vanishes! Ah, sir, live! Live in the heart of the seas! Here alone lies independence! Here I recognize no superiors! Here I’m free!”

A memorable scene from a science-fiction classic, Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.  This is the excellent F. P. Walter translation, which you can find on Project Gutenberg.

That said, I actually prefer the more succinct version of this quote from the 1954 Disney movie.  James Mason’s suave, measured enunciation brings out the introspective side of Nemo here and less of the passionate (though that he demonstrates elsewhere in the film). 

“Think of it. On the surface there is hunger and fear. Men still exercise unjust laws. They fight and tear one another to pieces. But a mere few feet beneath the waves their reign ceases, their evil drowns. Here, on the ocean floor, is the only independence. Here I am free!”

As Nemo proclaims his confident autonomy, we see Professor Aronnax’s reaction through the eyes of Paul Lukas, which is both awe and a sense of solemnity, maybe even uneasiness as he has seen how the captain’s words play out in his actions.

Side note – this is my favorite movie of all time!  It’s no purist’s adaptation, but I love how Disney infused the themes, characters, and events into an imaginative script, which still manages stays true to the spirit of Verne’s original.